Tag Archive: Lower school

Responsive Language

Responsive Language
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Author: Jane Kullmann and Lacy Chapman

Early Childhood Principal and Lower School Principal at ACS Cobham

Following our recent blog post on Responsive Classroom at ACS Cobham, we wanted to share with you a break down of Responsive Language – one of the key elements working within the Responsive Classroom approach.

To recap – Responsive Classroom (RC) is an approach to teaching that empowers students, through methods that allow them to be a part of their own learning. This is demonstrated through an increase in student choice, collaboration between students and teachers in forming class rules and an awareness of students developmental age.

Teacher language is an important part of RC, and can be broken into three categories: reinforcing, reminding and redirecting language.

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Responsive Classroom

Responsive Classroom
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Author: Jane Kullmann and Lacy Chapman

Early Childhood Principal and Lower School Principal at ACS Cobham

Responsive classroom (RC) is an approach to education implemented across the whole of Early Childhood and Lower School at ACS Cobham that we have found to be incredibly beneficial.

Responsive classroom is based on research and evidence that has been developed using controlled studies. The results have suggested greater student achievement, improved teaching and an overall better atmosphere within RC schools. Here is our guide to implementing RC and the benefits of doing so.

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‘Stop, Breathe and Be!’ An introduction to mindfulness at ACS Hillingdon

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Author: Lauren Seaberg

Mindfulness

Practicing mindfulness cultivates awareness of thoughts and feelings.

At any given moment, we have many thoughts running through our mind: I need to pay that bill! What will we have for dinner? We often find ourselves functioning on autopilot, going about our daily routines without real awareness.

Practicing mindfulness cultivates awareness of thoughts and feelings so you can make positive changes based on your realisations. You might, for instance, realise you’re feeling tired. In response, you may decide to reschedule an important meeting or take a few minutes to do a breathing practice beforehand.

Becoming more aware of the present moment can help us enjoy the world around us. It can also give us a better understanding of ourselves and others. Mindfulness brings about long-term changes in mood, levels of happiness and wellbeing. Scientific studies have even shown that mindfulness prevents depression. It positively affects the brain patterns underlying day-to-day stress and anxiety.

When applied in schools, mindfulness increases children’s self-esteem, concentration and overall performance. It impacts their ability to get along with others and helps them to cope with stress. Mindfulness is an acquired skill that can make a positive difference in our lives.

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