Author Archive: Jeremy Lewis

IB – the education you would want for yourself

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Author: Jeremy Lewis

Head of School at ACS Egham

“The world no longer rewards people for what they know – Google knows everything – but for what they can do with what they know. Because that is the main differentiator today, global education today needs to be much more about ways of thinking, involving creativity, critical thinking, problem solving and decision-making; about ways of working, including communication and collaboration.” [1]

Andreas Schleicher, Director for Education and Skills at the Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD)

The education you would want for yourself

What could I say which is more powerful than this?  Isn’t this what you would want for your child’s education, or for yourself – to learn a range of skills including how to be creative; to collaborate; communicate well with others and take your place comfortably in the world?

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Are we focusing too much on subject knowledge and not ‘learning’ at secondary school?

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Author: Jeremy Lewis

Head of School at ACS Egham

2015 Egham Graduations

With pens hardly dry from writing exam papers, or from marking them, we turn to look at what has been gained from all this revision and exam work.

A new research report[1] confirms what so many teachers fear, or feel, that there is far too much focus on subject knowledge and not enough focus on, well, ‘learning’ at secondary school level.

Many of you reading this will have done A levels and will be past masters at cramming facts. But how many of us were specifically taught at school how to learn for ourselves, how to apply information intelligently, perhaps to draw information or ideas from other people, and apply them to successfully solving a problem?

These are traditionally skills learned at university or in the workplace, but surely we should be asking why our education system has such a narrow focus, and why, by the time a 17 or 18 year old completes their mandatory education, they are not equipped with the right set of skills to help them thrive at university or in work?

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